Tag archive for Public safety unions

‘Disabled’ cops collect disability, go back to work

My colleague Mark Lagerkvist of New Jersey Watchdog published this investigation about a New Jersey cop who was permanently disabled because of his work cleaning up gory crime scenes. After he got his $1 million disability, he started a private firm that — you got it — …

Should idle firefighters be turned into police officers or doctors?

Fires and Firefighters.png
As this chart from marginalrevolution.com shows, structure fires in America have declined dramatically over the decades, but the number of firefighters has continued to rise, even during the recent recession. This has left local governments with an excess of idle fire personnel. What to do? Communities could look to reduce personnel, but there are limits on how low firefighter complements can go, and not only because of pressure from firefighters unions. After a certain point, shutting down firehouses pushes up response times. And though, even in the case of medical emergencies, researchers have cast doubt on the low-response-time imperative, certainly minutes matter to the public.

How police unions always get their way

If you are naive enough to believe that public safety unions primarily are about protecting and serving the public, then you need to read this piece in the Orange County Register reporting on the exploits of a law firm that represents police unions: “Rarely does …

Don’t forget to reform police and fire pensions

Had Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker been recalled from office, pension and other public employee reforms would be a dead letter throughout the country. But this union bit of muscle-flexing backfired, and it seems clear that the pendulum is swinging hard in the reform direction. But it’s still worth picking nits. Most likely for political reasons, Walker exempted police and other public safety workers from his reforms, even though police, fire and prison guard unions are the most out of control and their members receive the most lush benefits. Here’s a recent column I wrote arguing that reform must include these categories. I argue

Local GOP lines up behind pension-hiker

In Orange County, the local Republican Party chairman, Scott Baugh, is headlining a fund-raiser for a supervisorial candidate, Todd Spitzer — a former Assemblyman, prosecutor and previous board of supervisors member. This is significant because Spitzer, a close ally of the public safety unions, let the charge in 2001 for a retroactive pension increase that dramatically boosted the county’s unfunded pension liability

Northern California City Pays Nearly 350 Public Employees Six-Figure Salaries

Earlier today, our own Steven Greenhut noted the dire situation in Marin County, California, where staggering pension costs are being driven by a handful of retirees receiving huge payouts. Across the bay in Contra Costa County, the story is little better.

A devastating piece in the Bay Citizen notes that in the city of Richmond 337 public employees make over $100,000 a year — this in a city with an average annual income of $55,000. As the report notes:

The
highest paid individual was a police sergeant who earned $326,000, with
$211,000 derived from overtime and “other” pay. “Other” pay can include
things like incentive pay for being bilingual, uniform allowances, or
extra compensation for graveyard shifts.

Source: The Bay Citizen (http://s.tt/142N2)

The highest paid individual was a police sergeant who earned $326,000, with $211,000 derived from overtime and “other” pay. “Other” pay can include things like incentive pay for being bilingual, uniform allowances, or extra compensation for graveyard shifts.
The
highest paid individual was a police sergeant who earned $326,000, with
$211,000 derived from overtime and “other” pay. “Other” pay can include
things like incentive pay for being bilingual, uniform allowances, or
extra compensation for graveyard shifts.

Source: The Bay Citizen (http://s.tt/142N2)

The
highest paid individual was a police sergeant who earned $326,000, with
$211,000 derived from overtime and “other” pay. “Other” pay can include
things like incentive pay for being bilingual, uniform allowances, or
extra compensation for graveyard shifts.

Source: The Bay Citizen (http://s.tt/142N2)