Tag archive for political influence

Cities go broke when dumb or corrupt people run them…

Take San Bernardino, for instance. The city is already bankrupt, but it is being forced to raise police and fire salaries (when it can barely make payroll now) by $1 million thanks to a clause in its city charter which requires San Bernardino to match raises given the public safety personnel in other comparison California cities. The problem is, as this story points out, the 10 comparison cities are richer, with a more prosperous tax base, than San Bernardino and are paying more. And the problem is not new. The city has been on the path to insolvency for years, as this 2007 report made clear, but did little about it. 

Do unions give members their money’s worth?

One reason that labor’s opponents have made headway on issues like right to work is because of a growing sense even within the union movement that members are not getting their money’s worth from their sometimes expensive union dues. In 2011 I wrote about a …

Public sector unions and the fiscal cliff

The National Education Association (NEA), the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), and the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) have underwritten a spate of ads pressuring pivotal Democratic Senators–Mark Warner (VA) and Claire McCaskill (MO)–regarding the fiscal cliff. The objective of these …

Union Turnout Trumps Champions of Reform

Much of the conversation here at Public Sector Inc. and elsewhere has focused on the enormous amounts of union financial contributions to the Propositions 30 and 32 campaigns in California. Supporters of Gov. Brown’s Prop. 30, which will raise taxes on high-earners in California (see …

Unions flood money into California paycheck protection fight

Last week, I noted that close polling on California’s Proposition 32 — which would, among other things, end the ability of the state’s unions to spend membership dues on political causes without member consent — likely presaged “an orgy of union money in the final weeks of the race.” As new records filed with the Secretary of State’s office in Sacramento show, the reality has outpaced even the wildest expectations of those of us who anticipated the deluge

Factions and the GOP

Heading into the Republican Convention, there has been much speculation about the effect of factions inside the GOP. There are the libertarian followers of Ron Paul, the Tea Partiers, and the reformers from various states. In many accounts, factionalism has a negative connotation. But, as I’ve argued at length in a recent …

Public supports Prop. 32-for now anyway

New polling indicates that a majority (55%) of Californians support Prop. 32 (aka “paycheck protection”), which would bar unions in the Golden State from using dues for political purposes. Support has declined, however, as public employee unions have begun their campaign against the measure with …

Public sector unions lead fight against Prop.32

If approved by voters, Proposition 32 (aka “paycheck protection”) in California would constrict the use of union dues for political purposes. Not surprisingly, public employee unions, the heart and soul of organized labor in the Golden State, have made their opposition plain. They’ve put their …

Nurses back Brown and tax hike

The California Nurses Association has pledged $1 million to the campaign for Proposition 30 (hat tip: Andrew Marcum). The union has also promised to use its ground game on the measure’s behalf. So far it appears that the money raised for Brown’s initiative has not …

A “Modern-Day” tyranny?

As my colleague Dan DiSalvo highlighted in an earlier post, measures to restrict union dues for political purposes have been on the ballot in California twice–Proposition 226 under Governor Wilson and Proposition 75 under Governor Schwarzenegger. In 1998 Governor Wilson suggested, similar to Troy Senik more recently in his Spring 2012 City Journal article, that the California Teachers Association is “the single most powerful lobby in Sacramento.” Wilson went on to argue in favor of Prop